Monthly Archives: January 2012

Palawan diving

Palawan diving will be your best option

 

palawan diving

Image by davidagalvan via Flickr

When you interested in finding one of best locations for diving, then Palawan diving will be your best option. There you shall experience the fun and enjoyment of this water activity when you visit one of the many resorts that cater to every diver who tours on one of the most beautiful places in this area of Asia.

The many ship wrecks, spectacular coral reefs, wine blue ocean waters, sandy white beaches and the diving experience that you will get when you visit the island of Palawan will certainly be enough to satisfy any diver, whether you are new or experienced, young or old. This province offers the best sites for this activity that can only be found in this area in the Philippines.

The resorts is attracting more than 50,000 visitors each year, making it the more better option for divers everywhere around the world. There tourist will have the pleasure of taking in all the natural beauty that this province has to offer while exploring the under world when diving.

Those who visit here for the purpose of enjoying the underwater activities that are available will not need to travel to far as there are plenty of sites around the island. Visitors will have easy access to these sites as many shops that will serve the needs of divers who travel here for the purpose of diving the beautiful waters of this island.

Visitors for this type of sporting activity will find nine areas around the island where many areas that have spots so everyone will be able to enjoy. This province has plenty to offer, as not only its natural beauty, but has probably the best sites for this water activity in all of Asia.

Palawan diving is the fastest  growing sporting activity

People visit here from many countries around the globe to take part with the fastest growing sporting activities that never seems to end. And one of the places where most people are touring is the Palawan island diving sites around the Philippines. palawan diving

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Exotic Palawan

Exotic Palawan with

 

Turquoise waters, crystalline sand and foliage composed of tropical palms.

Miniloc Island palawan

These are the words we tend to associate with our idea of a seaside paradise. And in the Philippines, El Nido Resorts in Palawan, with its hidden lagoons, virgin rainforests, and exotic wildlife, embodies this tropical ideal.

El Nido in exotic Palawan

El Nido Resorts are comprised of Miniloc Island and Lagen Island in El Nido, and Apulit Island in Taytay, Palawan. These three private eco-resorts are found nestled in the middle of the Linapacan Strait in the north, the Sulu Sea in the east, and the South China Sea in the west, making them gateways to Palawan’s untouched islands. Each resort has its own personality and charm, topped with a spectrum of activities offered for any indulgence.

The New York Times #1 bestselling travel book, “1000 Places to See Before You Die” by Patricia Schultz, included El Nido in its 2011 edition. The international bestseller describes Palawan as a last frontier of extraordinary natural beauty. It also highlights Miniloc Island’s exceptional eco-tour that brings guests to its lagoons surrounded with limestone cliffs; and Lagen Island’s romantic over-water bungalows.

So whether it’s sailing across the island’s most beautiful cove, spelunking in Palawan’s caves or exploring the most beautiful lagoons, you get to enjoy it all amid the most picturesque tropical setting. And with an unlimited list of activities to complement the scenic backdrop, El Nido Resorts gives you the key to exotic Palawan.

source: malaya.com.ph

Lonely Planet Philippines: Palawan

Includes FREE planning and background information. You can never escape it. Everywhere you look there it is. Whether it’s the Sulu Sea to the east or the South China Sea to the west, as much a highway as a source of sustenance, nothing defines Palawan more than the water surrounding it. The proverbial island paradise with seascapes the equal of any in Southeast Asia, wildlife, both terrestrial and aquatic, this, the Philippines’ most sparsely populated region is also its most beguiling. Historically, it was always an outlier, an island apart. Known as Pa Lao Yu (island of beautiful harbour) before the arrival of the Spanish who later referred to it as paragua (umbrella) for its shape, control of Palawan was contested by the colonisers and Moros from Borneo for over a hundred years. These days the struggle is overdevelopment versus maintenance of the largely untouched environment. Gaisano, Robinson’s and SM – the signifiers of urbanisation elsewhere – have yet to make inroads. Because of its silhouette – a long sliver stretching 650km all the way from the Mindoro Strait to the tip of Borneo – there’s a certain liberating logic to travel in Palawan. Centrally located Puerto Princesa, the administrative and culinary capital, is also the transport hub. To the south, where there’s little government footprint, populated by indigenous tribal groups and Muslim communities, it’s rough but potentially rewarding travel for those with reserves of endurance. The majority of travellers go north, without question the highlight. Watching the sunset standing on El Nido’s ramshackle beachfront with a glorious view of Cadlao Island, or skimming along in a bangka around a maze of uninhabited islands in the Calamian Group feels somewhat post-apocalyptic – like the morning after the proverbial flood.

Includes FREE planning and background information. You can never escape it. Everywhere you look there it is. Whether it’s the Sulu Sea to the east or the South China Sea to the west, as much a highway as a source of sustenance, nothing defines Palawan more than the water surrounding it. The proverbial island paradise with seascapes the equal of any in Southeast Asia, wildlife, both terrestrial and aquatic, this, the Philippines’ most sparsely populated region is also its most beguiling. Historically, it was always an outlier, an island apart. Known as Pa Lao Yu (island of beautiful harbour) before the arrival of the Spanish who later referred to it as paragua (umbrella) for its shape, control of Palawan was contested by the colonisers and Moros from Borneo for over a hundred years. These days the struggle is overdevelopment versus maintenance of the largely untouched environment. Gaisano, Robinson’s and SM – the signifiers of urbanisation elsewhere – have yet to make inroads. Because of its silhouette – a long sliver stretching 650km all the way from the Mindoro Strait to the tip of Borneo – there’s a certain liberating logic to travel in Palawan. Centrally located Puerto Princesa, the administrative and culinary capital, is also the transport hub. To the south, where there’s little government footprint, populated by indigenous tribal groups and Muslim communities, it’s rough but potentially rewarding travel for those with reserves of endurance. The majority of travellers go north, without question the highlight. Watching the sunset standing on El Nido’s ramshackle beachfront with a glorious view of Cadlao Island, or skimming along in a bangka around a maze of uninhabited islands in the Calamian Group feels somewhat post-apocalyptic – like the morning after the proverbial flood.

List Price: $ 5.99

Price: $ 5.99

source: malaya.com.ph

Palawan’s tourism : Gov’t set to improve infrastructure

Palawan tourism

MANILA, Philippines—The year 2012 is going to be filled with preparations and projects for the Puerto Princesa Underground River’s emergence as an international Palawan  tourism star.

DENR Secretary Ramon J. P. Paje

With the underground jewel’s inclusion on the list of the new seven wonders of nature—a list that would be finalized in the first quarter of the new year following the verification of votes—the already rising number of tourists there is expected to increase even more.

This is why, according to Environment Secretary Ramon Paje, the government is focused on improving and increasing infrastructure to cope with the influx of visitors and the expectation that their numbers will further rise this year. Protecting the natural features of Puerto Princesa is also a priority, he added.

Paje said that following the underground river’s inclusion on the list of new seven wonders of nature, the current booking stands at 1,500 a day, but the capacity of the tourist facilities at present is only 800. The number of bookings is almost twice what could be accommodated, he noted.

But as big as this number is for Palawan

, “that can even double,” he said, especially when the final list of the New Seven Wonders that includes the underground river is officially confirmed. Even airlines are flying bigger airplanes to Palawan because of the number of tourists to Puerto Princesa, he noted.

The list of new seven wonders of nature, announced in November, was considered provisional because the organizers still had to validate votes received by the winners in a global poll. The final announcement is expected early in 2012, and Philippine officials are confident of the underground river’s place on the list.

Paje said that as far as he knew, the organizers would not release the ranking of all seven winners, but he believes the underground river in Palawan was among the top vote-getters.

Because of the visitors coming in droves and with more expected to arrive, Paje said, President Aquino has  made the Puerto Princesa Underground River a major Cabinet agenda item during its last meeting and ordered the expansion of the airport there to be an international gateway for tourists, especially those coming from such big markets as Xiamen, Shanghai and Kaoshiung.

The Department of Palawan

was instructed to develop plans for new hotels as well. The administration is also hoping for the private sector to come in.

But at the same time, the government wants to ensure that the star of the show—Palawan’s own natural wonders—will not be destroyed.

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources will play the crucial role of protecting the underground river even as the area around it is developed, according to Paje.

“We’ve been instructed by the President to ensure that as we expand and accommodate more tourists in Palawan, it will not damage the environment or cause damage to natural features,” he said in a phone interview.

“Even if we would want tourists to come to Palawan , we don’t want to commercialize it. We just want to make the transportation and infrastructure very efficient and tourist-friendly,” he added.

Paje also said that Palawan  underground river’s designation as one of seven new wonders in the world is sure to put it on the tourism map of the globe.

He noted that when China’s Great Wall and India’s Taj Mahal were named among the seven wonders of the world, they became top destinations and highlights of their country. It is hard to think of China without thinking of the Great Wall, while thinking of India immediately conjures an image of the Taj Mahal, he said.

source: globalnation.inquirer.net